2018 - 2019 Policy Library 
    
    Jan 20, 2019  
2018 - 2019 Policy Library

Chapter 9 Academic Services of Interest to the Faculty


9.1 Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum

9.2. Book Orders

9.3 Informational Technology Services (ITS)

9.4 Library Services

9.5 Office of the Registrar and Institutional Research

9.6 The Center for Writing and Public Discourse

9.7 The Quantitative and Computing Lab

9.8 The Center for Global Education

9.9 The Dreier Roundtable

9.10 The Kravis Lab


9.1 Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum

The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum was conceived as a place where students and faculty could gather for intellectual discourse in an intimate and relaxed setting and integrate their academic and social lives. Public programs are scheduled Monday through Thursday during the academic year and are publicized through the bi-weekly newsletter, The Fortnightly. While events are primarily for students, the Athenaeum hosts lunches, dinners, and receptions for academic classes, student organizations, and official functions of the College. To schedule a class event or get further information you can visit the Athenaeum website.

9.2. Book Orders

Orders for required texts and materials are made through the Huntley Bookstore. For more information, including information on book orders, visit the Huntley Bookstore website.

9.3 Informational Technology Services (ITS)

The department of Information Technology Services (ITS) provides technology support to further the College’s mission to educate students, support scholarship, increase visibility to our community, and facilitate our business processes effectively and collaboratively with our constituents. IT assists the College community through many activities, including-but not limited to-the following: planning for, implementing, and supporting web-based technologies; providing and administering multiple secure information systems for the College’s diverse business needs; facilitating access to both wireless and wired internet resources; troubleshooting support for hardware and software problems on the desktop, managing the College’s desktop computer/printer life cycle replacement program; supporting campus events that require media technology; supporting faculty in developing and enhancing their use of technologies for both instruction and research; developing and maintaining instructional computing classrooms and student computing labs; and offering help desk services.

9.3.1 ITS Help Desk- (909) 607-0911/ext. 70911

The ITS Help Desk provides the first point of contact for information technology assistance to the faculty and staff of Claremont McKenna College. IT Help Desk staff assist callers in resolving problems directly or distribute the call to the appropriate ITS staff member who can better solve the problem. If the Help Desk support line [(909) 607-0911 (ext. 70911)]  is momentarily unavailable, the voice mail system will take the call and messages will be answered as quickly as possible. Calls will be answered between the hours of 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Online requests may also be made through the ITS Service Request System for both Helpdesk and Media Services. Alternatively, an email regarding a problem may be sent to the Help Desk at help@cmc.edu. In the subject field of an email request, please enter the name or Claremont McKenna College department account of the person needing assistance and, in the body of the message, explain in detail what issues are being experienced. All messages will be automatically routed to the Help Desk system, where each message will be assigned to the appropriate ITS staff member.

9.4 Library Services

The Claremont Colleges Library holdings include over 2 million book titles and periodical subscriptions. The Claremont Colleges Library is a United States federal depository for government publications. The library makes records available for online government publications. It also holds documents from the State of California, the United Nations, and other international agencies. The Library also has renowned Special Collections and Libraries that house rare and unique materials.

Library Cards

Each college issues ID cards to its faculty. This card also serves as a faculty member’s library card, which must be presented when borrowing material from the Library.

  • A complementary borrowing card can be issued to spouses of faculty and to their children between the ages of 16 and 22.
  • Faculty may request Research Assistant (RA) borrowing cards from the Claremont Colleges Library Access Services desk.

Loan Periods

Faculty have an annual loan period with a May due date, but are asked to return materials as they finish using them. At the due date, all items which are still needed and have not been recalled may be renewed.

Periodicals

Most of the library’s periodical subscriptions are available online, with a small collection of print periodicals housed at the Library. The unbound periodicals are for use only in the library.

Course Readings

For books and other materials that are required reading on a syllabus and are being sold in Huntley Bookstore, the Library will pull a copy, if it already owns one, or purchase a copy if it does not already own one. These materials are placed in the Course Readings Area of the Library and may be checked out for four hours at a time. Faculty do not need to submit information about course readings to the Library, as the Library receives a list directly from the Bookstore.

For books that are suggested on a syllabus (but not required) and/or are not being sold in the Bookstore, the Library can place them in its Course Readings section upon the request of a faculty member. If the Library has the materials in its stacks, it will pull them and add them to the Course Readings area. For materials that are not owned by the Library, the Library will order a copy in either electronic or paper format.

Course Reserves

Physical materials, such as books, videos, and articles, may be placed on Reserve for classes. Print Course Reserve provides a loan period of four hours only. To place items on Reserve, faculty members should fill out a Library Reserve Form as early as possible. Faculty may include new book orders on the list. All other course reserve material requests are sent to each campus computing service that handles the online course system for that campus, such as Sakai or Canvas.

Resource Sharing

Resource Sharing (formerly Interlibrary Loan, ILL) is a service provided for faculty, staff and students of The Claremont Colleges. Resource Sharing borrows materials not available in the Library’s collections from other libraries. Faculty may request items from Resource Sharing when searching in Library Search (a.k.a. library catalog) and subscription databases using the “Get this item” icon. Faculty may also access the Resource Sharing Form from the Library homepage to request items.

Online Access

To access the Library’s databases and e-resources as well as their online library account, faculty must login using their network login username and password; these are the same login credentials that faculty use to access their campus email account.

Library Search

Library Search is an expanded version of a traditional online library catalog. It provides access to resources owned by the Claremont Colleges Library as well as millions of resources from libraries worldwide that are not owned by the Library. In addition to physical materials housed in the Library, Library Search also provides access to items indexed in subscription databases, including articles, e-Books, multimedia, and dissertations. Library Search is built on and harnesses the WorldCat platform and knowledge base, which have been integral to connecting libraries and making content accessible for decades.

Getting Help

If faculty need assistance, have questions about their library account or privileges, or have specific research needs, they may use the Library’s Ask Us email and chat service. Faculty may call the Library’s Services Desk at (909) 621-8150 to receive immediate assistance during open hours. Faculty may also contact the subject librarian in their discipline directly if they have questions related to research, new acquisitions, or inviting a librarian to their class.

Subject Librarians

Subject Librarians can provide advice on locating and using both print and e-resources. They provide customized instruction for classes and groups, as well as individual consultations that can be scheduled by appointment. They can also be a point of contact for faculty members who are interested in recommending new purchases.

9.5 Office of the Registrar and Institutional Research

The Office of the Registrar and Institutional Research provides services to students, alumni, faculty, and staff by maintaining timely and accurate academic records. The Registrar is a source of information regarding student transcripts, course descriptions, course schedules, senior thesis requirements, the academic calendar, degree requirements, and final examination schedules. Institutional Research conducts research to support the continuing academic advancement of Claremont McKenna College, institutional decision-making, and strategic planning. The Office of the Registrar and Institutional Research is located in Bauer Center North. For more information, please visit the Office of the Registrar and Institutional Research website.

9.6 The Center for Writing and Public Discourse

The staff at The Center for Writing and Public Discourse tutors CMC students or students enrolled in CMC courses on an individual basis. The staff look at papers from any and all disciplines, including Senior Theses, and help students refine the argumentation of their essays and the clarity of their prose. However, the Center is not a copy-editing or proofreading service. The staff review drafts of essays with students and provide advice on how to improve the paper. The Center does not tutor take-home exams. Faculty members who would like to schedule in-class visits or customized workshops for their students should email the CWPD Director. The CWPD Director also hosts working group sessions on writing pedagogy with interested faculty. Students should schedule appointments using the CWPD website, though the staff do see students on a walk-in basis provided there is not another appointment scheduled for that time. For more information or to make an appointment, please visit The Center for Writing and Public Discourse website.

9.7 The Quantitative and Computing Lab

The Quantitative and Computing Lab serves as the transdisciplinary campus hub and comprehensive support lab for students seeking assistance with a broad spectrum of quantitative issues, including mathematics, computation, statistics, programming, and data analysis. It provides three essential services:

  • Tutoring and course support: The QCL provides regular tutoring for a wide range of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science courses.
  • Quantitative Consulting Services for Research Projects: The Lab provides direct support and consulting services for advanced student projects (e.g. senior theses and other independent quantitative research projects) that require technical expertise for which students may need assistance.
  • Workshops: Throughout the academic year, the Lab organizes short workshops on quantitative topics of interest to students and faculty, often in collaboration with relevant research institutes.

In addition to structured activities as described above, the Lab also fosters a general environment of collaboration, encouraging interdisciplinary discussions and projects with a defining quantitative component. For more information, please contact QCL Director Jeho Park.

9.8 The Center for Global Education

The Center for Global Education manages academic off-campus study experiences for CMC students. These include study abroad, domestic and international exchange programs, The Washington Program, The Silicon Valley Program, and summer Faculty-Led Programs. Students work directly with the CGE staff to ascertain their individual academic and personal goals for a semester or year off-campus and, together, select the best program abroad or within the United States to meet these goals. For more information, please visit the Center for Global Education website.

9.9 The Dreier Roundtable

The Dreier Roundtable (DRt) at Claremont McKenna College is an innovative, multidisciplinary public policy program to attract, educate and promote future leaders in public policy. Together with CMC’s talented undergraduates and accomplished faculty, DRt’s team works to make CMC a prominent West Coast venue for discussion of public policy issues, and to make a contribution to research in public policy. A distinguishing feature of DRt is promoting direct student engagement in public affairs through funding internship opportunities, as we believe experiential learning is a primary means of educating students for leadership in government and public service. DRt seeks to expose CMC students to a myriad of opportunities and experiences that inform their futures in public service. DRt’s mission reflects the legacy of trustee and alumnus David Dreier’s 32-year career in public life, and CMC’s mission to foster “leadership in business, government, and the professions, and to support faculty and student scholarship that contribute to intellectual vitality and the understanding of public policy issues.” DRt is particularly focused on issues Dreier emphasized throughout his Congressional career: international trade, immigration studies, institutional development, and information flows. DRt plans to build on his work in those areas, among others. The DRt also hosts the Annenberg - Dreier Commission, a special focus program that seeks to strengthen the free flow of goods, services, capital, information, ideas and people throughout the greater Pacific. Inspired by the Congressional work of Chairman Dreier, the ADC is an affiliated program under the Dreier Roundtable focused on addressing policy challenges within these areas by developing concise, actionable recommendations that are readily adoptable by key stakeholders. For more information, please visit the Dreier Roundtable website.

9.10 The Kravis Lab

The Kravis Lab for Social Impact is a resource for students, faculty, and other members of the CMC community who are interested in improving the lives of people around the globe. Through creativity, collaboration, and courage, students at the Kravis Lab effect positive, sustainable social impact. The Kravis Lab has three major objectives: helping students develop the Core Skills for Success in college and in life; engaging with and building capacity of non-profit and social profit organizations to help solve problems in our local community; and equipping students with the tools and support they need to be social entrepreneurs and innovators launching initiatives that will solve some of the world’s most pressing problems. Please contact Gemma Bulos or Scott Sherman for further information.